Texas authorities: We won't mention shooter's name again

Mourners participate during a candlelight vigil held for the victims of a fatal shooting at the First Baptist Church of Sutherland Springs, Sunday, Nov. 5, 2017, in Sutherland Springs, Texas. (Jay Janner/Austin American-Statesman via AP)

The shooter's name went unspoken at a news conference on the killings at a church in Sutherland Springs, Texas, and authorities there said they intend to keep refraining from saying it.

"We do not want to glorify him and what he has done," Texas Department of Public Safety Regional Director Freeman Martin said at the Monday briefing.

FBI Special Agent in Charge Christopher Combs agreed, saying "we don't talk about the shooter" in the hope that it "doesn't encourage other people to do horrific acts."

That choice reflects a larger movement of authorities, victims' families and academics who want to deny to mass killers the fame they often seek, and to keep from inspiring the next one.

The message: Don't hide information, but don't hype it. Report the name of a shooter when it's first released, then leave it out.

The movement was created by No Notoriety, a group at the forefront of the effort that focuses on spreading simple, meme-friendly ideas.

"Stop making rampage mass murderers famous," read a post on Facebook and Twitter, along with a blotted out photo of the Texas shooter, who killed 26 people.

"Focus on victims and heroes — not their killers!" one popular post said.